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How I Use Triberr

triberr

Over the last few months, I have been trying out the Triberr service as a way to expand my content’s exposure to new audiences and to give my followers more content from other blogs as well. Now I know some of you will remember my post awhile back about why I turned off Twitterfeed, and you may wonder if I have gone back to automating.

The answer is I haven’t. I was wary of Triberr for the longest time, until I found out that they had created a manual option where you can review posts before you tweet them. That was all I needed to hear to give it a try.

The following is my Triberr strategy. Hopefully this will give those who are not fans of the service a little insight into some ways it could work for you.

triberr

Over the last few months, I have been trying out the Triberr service as a way to expand my content’s exposure to new audiences and to give my followers more content from other blogs as well. Now I know some of you will remember my post awhile back about why I turned off Twitterfeed, and you may wonder if I have gone back to automating.

The answer is I haven’t. I was wary of Triberr for the longest time, until I found out that they had created a manual option where you can review posts before you tweet them. That was all I needed to hear to give it a try.

The following is my Triberr strategy. Hopefully this will give those who are not fans of the service a little insight into some ways it could work for you.

1. I chose tribes based on knowing the people involved in them.

I’ve received a lot of Triberr invites since the service got started, and for awhile turned them all down due to the automated tweeting thing. After I found out they went manual, I accepted my first invite based on the fact that I knew all of the members of the tribe and already subscribed to their blogs in my RSS feeder. I was already tweeting out their content on a regular basis, so I saw no harm in having them do the same for mine.

2. I have everyone set on manual.

It doesn’t matter who you are, or what you blog about. No matter how devoted your fans are, there are always going to be those occasional posts that you write that will not resonate with everyone. I know that not every one of my posts work for everyone else’s Twitter audience, and I know that not every post from my other tribesmen and women will fit my Twitter audience either. Hence, I have all of my tribe members set to manual mode.

If you haven’t logged into your Triberr in awhile, you should go check it out. They recently changed the system to where you can have manual / automatic settings for each member. Just login to your account and go to Tribes > Your Tribe > Tribe Members and adjust the settings for each member using the settings dropdown.

Triberr Member Settings

Now even if I didn’t have to check everyone’s post for audience-fit assurance, I would still have Triberr set to manual simply because I have a certain schedule for my tweets. I share blog posts every hour, generally from 7 AM to 9 PM Arizona time. And I just share one blog post per hour. If you belong to multiple tribes, what you might run into being on auto is several tweets being sent through your stream all at once, or tweets getting sent during hours where people are least likely to see your tweets. By choosing manual review, you can just copy and paste the Triberr tweet into your favorite scheduling app like HootSuite, Buffer, or your other favorite Twitter management tool.

Lastly, even if I didn’t do the QA check or care when the tweets get sent out, I do also like to update the tweets to show the authors of the posts since some blogs in my tribes have multiple contributors, guest authors, etc. So while I’m checking out a post (because yes, I do read all of your posts to make sure they are about blogging, social media, or related topics and not how to do a phone number lookup or something else off topic which should comfort you and my Twitter audience alike), I can pick up the post author’s Twitter handle and add it to the tweet so they know their post is being shared as well.

3. I use a custom RSS feed.

Triberr was actually my motivation to create a customized RSS feed for my writing, which has come in quite handy on other sites that allow you to have RSS feed sharing, including my LinkedIn profile‘s WordPress app and Dooid profile to name just a few.

Since I write more for other sites than I usually do on my own, and I typically don’t want every post on my site shared with my tribes, the only solution was a customized RSS feed where I could just choose which posts I wanted to share on Triberr and other networks. This has so far worked out quite well.

If you’re not as spread out as I am, but you don’t want to share every post on your site with your tribe, you can always try creating a category like Featured for your blog and grabbing the RSS feed for that category only and submitting it on Triberr. For WordPress, it is generally going to be yourblog.com/category/feed/ or similar depending on your permalink structure. Or you can go to your category archive page in Firefox and use the RSS button in the browser’s address bar to grab that category’s feed.

4. I give karma to posts I tweet.

Ok, I get lazy sometimes and forget, but for the most part since I’m doing the manual review of posts, I give karma (the thumb’s up) to posts I choose to tweet. See how karma works here.

5. I created a Triberr Twitter list.

In order to connect more with my tribes, I decided to create a Twitter list of all of the people in my tribes. It’s up to 54 now since I’m in multiple tribes, but it’s nice to interact more with others and see what their interests are outside of the Triberr posts. I’ve found a lot of new blogs just by watching that stream as my tribes have introduced me to new bloggers as well.

Your Triberr Strategy

Are you on Triberr? What’s your strategy when it comes to getting the most out of Triberr? Share your thoughts in the comments!

By Kristi Hines

Kristi Hines is a freelance writer, professional blogger, and ghostwriter who specializes in business and marketing topics.